Friday, November 22, 2013

Killing Kennedy


President John F. Kennedy  May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963
President John F. Kennedy
May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963

The very word "secrecy" is repugnant in a free and open society; and we are as a people inherently and historically opposed to secret societies, to secret oaths and secret proceedings.

We decided long ago that the dangers of excessive and unwarranted concealment of pertinent facts far outweighed the dangers which are cited to justify it. Even today, there is little value in opposing the threat of a closed society by imitating its arbitrary restrictions.

Even today, there is little value in insuring the survival of our nation if our traditions do not survive with it. And there is very grave danger that an announced need for increased security will be seized upon those anxious to expand its meaning to the very limits of official censorship and concealment. 

That I do not intend to permit to the extent that it is in my control.

And no official of my Administration, whether his rank is high or low, civilian or military, should interpret my words here tonight as an excuse to censor the news, to stifle dissent, to cover up our mistakes or to withhold from the press and the public the facts they deserve to know." - Fragment from a speech that President John F. Kennedy gave at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel on April 27, 1961 before the American Newspaper Publishers Association. 

Arrival of President Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963
Arrival of President Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963

It is such an irony that the details of the assassination of a man who abhorred secrecy are  kept secret to this day. Fifty years later more than 50,000 have not yet been revealed to the public! Any official explanation or theory can only be based on what the public is allowed to know. This very fact makes any explanation incomplete if not invalid. 

Like no other event in the American history, assassination of the 35th president of the United States gave birth to countless conspiracy theories. 

Circumstances surrounding the assassination are rather mysterious and the official version put out by the Warren Commission in 1964 has been discredited long time ago. 

Presidential motorcade - JFK and his wife riding with Texas Governor John Connally  Dallas, Texas November 22, 1963
Presidential motorcade - JFK and his wife riding with 
the Texas Governor John Connally
Dallas, Texas November 22, 1963

Just as someone wrote, to solve a criminal case you need to know the motive, the means and circumstances, but the killing of president Kennedy seems to be one big swamp of missing evidence, shadowy characters and conclusions that lead nowhere.

One thing is certain. Assassination of JFK was a conspiracy, but to this day we do not know who was behind it. In fact, we may never know.

Dominique Allmon