Friday, July 23, 2010

Inception - Decoding the Mind in Christopher Nolan’s Thriller


"An idea can transform the world and rewrite all the rules." Christopher Nolan

*The Inception movie, a metaphysical thriller that leaves most people confused, has just gotten an expert explanation for the mysterious plot and "528" code. The movie repeats the number "528" - a frequency of energy - numerous times in a mathematical code, a phone number, on a napkin, two vault combinations, and the main room wherein the movie's climax is centered. Here, special music is played to help "kick" the operatives out of three "levels" of violent dream states. A "528-491" combination unlocks the safe containing the greatest secret, treasure, motivation, and catharsis for the main characters disheartened by their loss of loved ones. The idea of linking music for social transcendence with "528" and LOVE in Inception appears to have come from Dr. Leonard G. Horowitz, the discoverer of the "Perfect Circle of Sound," and a frequent contributor to Hollywood's screenwriters.  The author of 16 books has written extensively on the subject of 528 as it relates to universal construction, healing, Spiritual Renaissance, creationism, and what Nolan terms "inception." - Adapted from Tetrahedron's Newsletter


This Time the Dream’s on Me

By A. O. Scott

The relationship between movies and dreams has always been - to borrow a term from psychoanalysis — overdetermined. From its first flickerings around the time Freud was working on "The Interpretation of Dreams" seemed to replicate the uncanny, image-making power of the mind, much as still photography had in the decades before. And over the course of the 20th century, cinema provided a vast, perpetually replenishing reservoir of raw material for the fantasies of millions of people. Freud believed that dreams were compounded out of the primal matter of the unconscious and the prosaic events of daily life. If he were writing now, he would have to acknowledge that they are also, for many of us, made out of movies.  

And movies, more often than not these days, are made out of other movies. Inception, Christopher Nolan’s visually arresting, noir-tinged caper, is as packed with allusions and citations as a film studies term paper. Admirers of Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner” and Stanley Kubrick’s “2001” will find themselves in good company, though “Inception” does not come close to matching the impact of those durable cult objects. It trades in crafty puzzles rather than profound mysteries, and gestures in the direction of mighty philosophical questions that Mr. Nolan is finally too tactful, too timid or perhaps just too busy to engage. 

So “Inception” is not necessarily the kind of experience you would take to your next shrink appointment. It is more like a diverting reverie than a primal nightmare, something to be mused over rather than analyzed, something you may forget as soon as it’s over. Which is to say that the time - nearly two and a half hours - passes quickly and for the most part pleasantly, and that you see some things that are pretty amazing, and amazingly pretty: cities that fold in on themselves like pulsing, three-dimensional maps; chases and fights that defy the laws that usually govern space, time and motion; Marion Cotillard’s face. 

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